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Patrick-Murray Administration Announces 91 Percent Reduction in Toxic Mercury Air Emissions

The Patrick-Murray Administration today announced that toxic mercury air emissions in Massachusetts have fallen by 91 percent since 1996, greatly exceeding the original goal of 75 percent, according to a study released by the Massachusetts Department of Environmental Protection (MassDEP). The reductions have been accomplished in part by the Administration's comprehensive efforts targeting mercury pollution from municipal waste combustors, coal-fired power plants, mercury-added products and other sources. To continue the progress in this area, Massachusetts will need strong federal and international actions similar to what has been accomplished in the Northeast. In particular, a proposed federal rule by the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency would be a major step forward, by greatly reducing mercury pollution from coal-fired power plants across the country. Massachusetts' state rule for coal-fired plants is already more stringent than the proposed federal mercury limits, but the federal rule, if implemented, would be an important step forward in reducing toxic mercury transported on the winds from Midwest and Southeast states and deposited from the air into Massachusetts.

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Group points blame at mercury

Environment Massachusetts seeks federal emission rules aimed at coal-fired power plants and mercury is pointing to the toxin's spoiling of fish in state waters, including local ponds and lakes and the Charles and Sudbury rivers.

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Treasured Pond Contaminated With Toxic Pollution

One of Massachusetts most treasured waterways is contaminated with mercury, according to a new report from Environment Massachusetts.  The report found 124 waterways in the state that have advisories for mercury. The advisories instruct citizens to limit their consumption of certain fish in Massachusetts' waterways due to mercury contamination.

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Springfield smoggiest Mass. city in 2010

The nonprofit Environment Massachusetts has released a new report showing that Springfield residents were exposed to air pollution that exceeded federal safety standards on a total of five days last year.  

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