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News Release | Environment Massachusetts Research and Policy Center

Northeast States Can Make Huge Difference in Tackling Climate-Altering Pollution

Ten Northeast States, from Maryland to Maine, are responsible for as much climate-altering carbon pollution as all but nine nations, according to a report released today by Environment Massachusetts. In 2010, the region emitted 533 million metric tons of carbon pollution, more than the United Kingdom, Saudi Arabia, Mexico, Brazil and France. The report also shows that lowering global warming emissions is consistent with a growing economy. 

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News Release | Environment Massachusetts

Strong Support in Massachusetts for Taking Solar Energy to the Next Level

With solar energy on the rise in Massachusetts, Environment Massachusetts joined 58 cities, towns, businesses, along with environmental, public health and civic organizations today in submitting letters to Governor Patrick and his Department of Energy Resources (DOER) urging them expand the state's solar requirement and to set goal of at least 50,000 solar roofs in Massachusetts by the end of the decade. Touting widespread support from the public and a broad array of stakeholders, many organizations attended a public hearing urging Massachusetts to seal Massachusetts’ status as a national leader by setting bold and achievable goals and updating key policies.

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News Release | Environment Massachusetts

Keep Cape Cod Open, Protected from Congressional Raids

Boston, MA – On the first day of spring, Environment Massachusetts unveiled a list of the top ten reasons Cape Cod National Seashore deserves protection from federal budget cuts and overdevelopment.

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News Release | Environment Massachusetts

Massachusetts Joins Northeast States Plan Deeper Cuts in Power Plant Pollution

Power plant pollution in the Northeast would decline by more than 20 percent in the next decade under a plan announced today by Massachusetts, Northeast and Mid-Atlantic state environmental and energy officials.

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