Updates

Massachusetts moms for clean air.

In October, Environment Massachusetts staff members Ben Wright and Lauren Randall brought four mothers from Needham, Belchertown, Brookline and Boston to meet face-to-face with Sen. Scott Brown and urge him to oppose attacks on the Clean Air Act that are supported by polluters and their allies in congress. During the meeting, the mothers asked Sen. Brown to oppose Sen. Rand Paul’s (Ky.) legislation, which would have allowed out-of-state polluters to continue to shirk their responsibility for the pollution they cause—pollution that leads to thousands of childhood asthma attacks in Massachusetts alone. On Nov. 10, both Sen. Brown and Sen. Kerry stood with Massachusetts’ kids and voted against Rand Paul’s dirty air act.

News Release | Environment Massachusetts

Broad Range of Stakeholders Call on Governor Patrick to Improve Successful Clean Energy and Anti-Pollution Program

Ninety-two Massachusetts organizations, businesses, and officials joined more than two hundred and fifteen other stakeholders from across the region in calling on Governor Patrick and other Northeast and Mid-Atlantic governors to build on progress reducing pollution and promoting clean energy by improving the Regional Greenhouse Gas Initiative (RGGI).  The coalition highlighted RGGI’s success to date and called for strengthening of the program’s pollution reduction targets and increasing investment in clean energy and energy efficiency measures that benefit the climate, the economy, public health, and energy consumers.

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News Release | Environment Massachusetts

Governor Patrick Signs Bill to Expand Successful Solar Energy Programs

Governor Patrick signed a bill today that will dramatically expand access to solar energy for families, businesses and local governments. The bill, An Act relative to competitively priced electricity in the Commonwealth, makes refinements to the state’s Green Communities Act and includes provisions to enhance the development of solar, wind and energy efficiency programs. Among the major improvements was an expansion of the net-metering program, which allows local governments, businesses and homeowners to sell the electricity they generate from solar panels and other small onsite renewable energy sources back to utilities to offset their electric bills, and even generate some revenue. 

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News Release | Environment Massachusetts

New Report: Extreme Downpours and Snowstorms Up 81 Percent in Massachusetts

Eleven months after Hurricane Irene led to flooding that devastated much of Massachusetts, a new Environment Massachusetts report confirms that extreme rainstorms and snowstorms are happening 81 percent more frequently in Massachusetts since 1948.

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Report | Environment Massachusetts Research and Policy Center

When it Rains, it Pours

Global warming is happening now and its effects are being felt in the United States and around the world. Among the expected consequences of global warming is an increase in the heaviest rain and snow storms, fueled by increased evaporation and the ability of a warmer atmosphere to hold more moisture.

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News Release | Environment Massachusetts

Massachusetts Legislators Pass Bill to Expand Successful Solar Energy Programs

Massachusetts legislators sent a comprehensive energy bill to the governor's desk today that will dramatically expand access to solar energy for families, businesses and local governments. The bill, An Act relative to competitively priced electricity in the Commonwealth, expands the state's most successful solar program, the net-metering program, which allows local governments, homeowners, businesses and others to sell the excess solar power they generate back to the grid, significantly offsetting the cost of installing solar. The cap on net-metering was lifted from 1% of peak load for private generation and 2% for public generation to 3% for both private and public entities. This means that a total of 6% of Massachusetts' electricity can now be net-metered.

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